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Cohoes AN-78 - History

Cohoes AN-78 - History



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Cohoes II
(AN-78: dp. 775; 1. 168'6"; b. 33'10"; dr. 10'10", s. 12
k.; cpl. 46; a. 1 3"; cl. Cohoes)

The second Cohoes (AN-78) was launched 29 November 1944 by Commercial Iron Works, Portland, Oreg.; sponsored by Mrs. W. Johnson, commissioned 23 March 1945, Lieutenant D. B. Little, USNR, in command: and reported to the Pacific Fleet.

After training at Pearl Harbor, Cohoes sailed 20 June 1945 for Eniwetok, arriving 2 July. She remained at Eniwetok installing, maintaining, and then removing the net line there until 16 October, when she sailed for Ponape, arriving 18 October to lay a mooring. In Langar Roads, she salvaged and relaid a Japanese mooring buoy, and performed similar operations in the Carolines and Marshalls until 20 November, when she cleared Kwajalein for Pearl Harbor and San Francisco, arriving 12 December for duty at Tiburon Net Depot.

Cohoes served at Tiburon until 8 April 1946, when she sailed for duty at Astoria, Oreg. She returned to San Francisco 3 September, and remained there until 25 August 1947 when she sailed for San Diego, arriving 27 August. There Cohoes was placed out of commission in reserve 3 September 1947.


Cohoes AN-78 - History

USS Marietta (AN-82) on 19 June 1945
Click on this photograph for links to larger images of this class.

Class: COHOES (AN-78)
Design: Navy YN-97/AN-78
Displacement (tons): 650 light, 785 full
Dimensions (feet): 168.5' oa, 146.0' wl x 33.8' e x 10.8 full
Original Armament: 1-3"/50 4-20mm (AN-78, 81, 84-88, 90-91)
Later armaments: 1-3"/50 3-20mmT (1945: AN 79-92) 1-3"/50 3-20mmS (1949: AN-78) 1-3"/50 (1961-68: AN-80, 84, 90)
3-20mmT or none (1958-61: AN 79, 83, 91, 92)
Complement: 46 (1944)
Speed (kts.): 12.3
Propulsion (HP): 1,200
Machinery: Diesel electric, 1 screw

Construction:

AN Name Ord. Builder Keel Launch Commiss.
78 COHOES 31 Jul 43 Commercial IW 15 Jun 44 29 Nov 44 23 Mar 45
79 ETLAH 31 Jul 43 Commercial IW 30 Jun 44 16 Dec 44 16 Apr 45
80 SUNCOCK 31 Jul 43 Commercial IW 30 Nov 44 16 Feb 45 5 May 45
81 MANAYUNK 31 Jul 43 Commercial IW 18 Dec 44 30 Mar 45 25 May 45
82 MARIETTA 31 Jul 43 Commercial IW 17 Feb 45 27 Apr 45 22 Jun 45
83 NAHANT 31 Jul 43 Commercial IW 31 Mar 45 30 Jun 45 24 Aug 45
-- YN 103-108 31 Jul 43 Commercial IW -- -- --
84 NAUBUC 4 Sep 43 Marine Iron & SB 31 Dec 43 15 Apr 44 15 Mar 45
85 ONEOTA 4 Sep 43 Marine Iron & SB 9 Feb 44 27 May 44 12 Mar 45
86 PASSACONAWAY 4 Sep 43 Marine Iron & SB 15 Apr 44 30 Jun 44 27 Apr 45
-- YN-112 4 Sep 43 Marine Iron & SB -- -- --
87 PASSAIC 4 Sep 43 Leathem D. Smith SB 25 Apr 44 29 Jun 44 6 Mar 45
88 SHAKAMAXON 4 Sep 43 Leathem D. Smith SB 30 Jun 44 9 Sep 44 6 Apr 45
89 TONAWANDA 4 Sep 43 Leathem D. Smith SB 12 Sep 44 14 Nov 44 9 May 45
-- YN 116-118 4 Sep 43 Leathem D. Smith SB -- -- --
90 TUNXIS 4 Sep 43 Zenith Dredge 2 May 44 18 Aug 44 28 Mar 45
91 WAXSAW 4 Sep 43 Zenith Dredge 31 May 44 15 Sep 44 6 May 45
92 YAZOO 4 Sep 43 Zenith Dredge 6 Jul 44 18 Oct 44 31 May 45
-- YN-122 4 Sep 43 Zenith Dredge -- -- --
-- YN 123-126 30 Sep 43 John H. Mathis -- -- --
-- YN 127-132 -- Not ordered -- -- --

Disposition:
AN Name Decomm. Strike Disposal Fate MA Sale
78 COHOES 30 Jun 72 30 Jun 72 21 Feb 73 Sold --
79 ETLAH 31 May 60 1 Jul 63 1 Jul 63 MA/R --
80 SUNCOCK 12 Jun 47 1 Sep 62 1 Sep 62 MA/R --
81 MANAYUNK 19 Jul 46 1 Sep 62 1 Sep 62 MA/R 8 Dec 71
82 MARIETTA 21 Dec 59 1 Sep 76 1 Feb 62 Trf. --
83 NAHANT 30 Sep 68 1 Oct 68 15 Oct 68 Trf. --
-- YN 103-108 -- -- 2 Oct 43 Canc. --
84 NAUBUC 6 Sep 46 1 Feb 75 21 Aug 75 Sold --
85 ONEOTA 6 Feb 47 1 Jul 63 1 Jul 63 MA/R 22 Jan 76
86 PASSACONAWAY 8 Apr 47 1 Jul 63 1 Jul 63 MA/R 29 Sep 76
-- YN-112 -- -- 23 Oct 43 Canc. --
87 PASSAIC 22 Oct 47 1 Jul 63 1 Jul 63 MA/R 29 Sep 76
88 SHAKAMAXON 21 Apr 47 1 Jul 63 1 Jul 63 MA/R --
89 TONAWANDA 18 Dec 59 15 Apr 77 13 May 60 Trf. --
-- YN 116-118 -- -- 23 Oct 43 Canc. --
90 TUNXIS 20 Jul 55 1 Sep 76 1 Aug 63 Trf. --
91 WAXSAW 23 Mar 60 1 Sep 76 1 Aug 63 Trf. --
92 YAZOO 28 Aug 62 1 Jul 63 1 Jul 63 MA/R 21 Nov 74
-- YN-122 -- -- 23 Oct 43 Canc. --
-- YN 123-126 -- -- 23 Oct 43 Canc. --
-- YN 127-132 -- -- 2 Oct 43 Canc. --

Class Notes:
FY 1944. On 5 Apr 43 VCNO directed the District Craft Development Board (DCDB) to determine the requirements during 1943 and 1944 for fleet service craft for the naval districts, for advanced bases, and for lend lease. On 28 Apr 43 the Board recommended the construction of 256 fleet service craft to fill these requirements, including 36 small steel-hulled net tenders (YN). Contracts were awarded for 30 of these between 31 Jul 43 and 30 Sep 43. On 2 Oct 43 the DCDB recommended the cancellation of 21 of these 36 vessels because the number authorized was "in excess of known requirements." This excess was due in part to the changed strategic situation since April 1943 and in part to the use of pontoon barges in lieu of net tenders in sheltered harbors. The Board also recommended that of the 21 to be cancelled the maximum possible number be taken from shipyards on the West Coast. As a result the last six vessels of the class were never ordered and on 23 Oct 43 contracts for 15 units were cancelled.

These ships were a product improvement of the YN-1 class, being of about the same size but with more powerful main propulsion diesels and the 3" gun relocated aft. Initially the class had four single 20mm guns, including one on a platform between the bridge and stack that had originally been designed to carry a rangefinder. This arrangement was not changed in late 1944, when a similar arrangement was found to be unsatisfactory on the AN-38 class, but on 28 Apr 45 CNO directed the replacement of the ships' four 20mm single mounts with three twin mounts, which permitted the removal of the former rangefinder platform. The last units of the class were commissioned with this modified configuration and Navy records indicate that most of the earlier units were similarly modified in 1945.


Cohoes AN-78 - History

Sphinx (ARL-24)

History of The USS Sphinx (ARL-24)

USS Sphinx (ARL-24) was laid down as LST-963 on 20 October 1944 by the Bethlehem Steel Co. Hingham, MA. Named Sphinx and re designated AR-24 on 11 September 1944 launched on 18 November 1944 converted into a landing craft repair ship at the Merrill Steven’s Dry-dock, Jacksonville, FL. and commissioned on 10 May 1945.

On 12 June, she sailed for the West Coast transited the Panama Canal on 23 June and proceeded via San Diego, to San Francisco. Sphinx arrived in Pearl Harbor on 21 July and repaired craft there until 27 August when she sailed for Adak, Alaska. Before she reached Adak, her sailing orders were modified, routing her to Japan. She arrived at Mutsu Bay, Honshu, on 14 September and began repairing and refitting minesweepers. Sphinx moved to Yokosuka on 20 November and sailed for Saipan on 3 December 1945. She operated in the central Pacific islands until entering Pearl Harbor on 9 January 1947 en route to the west Coast for decontamination. The ship had participated in Operation ‘Crossroads’ the atomic bomb test at Bikini Atoll in the Marshall’s from early April to 29 August 1946.

Sphinx arrived At San Pedro, Calif., on 22 January where she was decontaminated and prepared for inactivation. She was placed out of commission, in reserve, on 26 May 1947. She was re-commissioned on 3 November 1950. She stood out of San Diego on 17 August 1951 and proceeded via Pearl harbor to Japan. Sphinx arrived at Yokosuka on 29 September. During this time she repaired and serviced fleet units that were being used in Korea. The ship returned to San Diego on 4 June 1952 and operated along the west coast during 1955, and on 31 January 1956 was again placed out of commission, in reserve, and berthed in San Diego.

She was towed to New Orleans, La. In February, and on 16 December 1967 placed in commission. The ship sailed for the west coast on 8 January 1968 and arrived at San Diego on 23 February. On 22 April, Sphinx and Cohoes (AN-78) sailed for the western pacific. The ships made port at Pearl Harbor, Kusaie, Guam, and Subic Bay. Sphinx sailed independently from there on 6 June and four days later arrived at Vung Tau, South Vietnam. Sphinx moved to Dong Tam on 11 June. The repair ship was on a non-rotating basis, and during 1969 had very little time underway. She operated in the Tien Giang and Ham Luong rivers, providing services and support for the river boats of TF-117, as they engaged in operations against the Viet Cong. The ship sailed from Vietnam on 21 June for a yard period at Sasebo and returned on 25 August. Upon her return to Vietnam Sphinx operated along the Vam Co River, and also developed helicopter capabilities, handling 50 landings before 31 December 1969. She remained in Vietnam until 14 December 1970 when she weighed anchor for a yard period at Yokosuka. On the last day of the year, the ship lost power in both main engines and was adrift 340 miles south of Sasebo. On 2 January 1971, USS Chipola (AO-63) took her under tow for Sasebo, where she was repaired. Sphinx was back off Vietnam on 11 March and remained there until sailing for the west coast several months later. She arrived at Bremerton, Washington. On 2 July and prepared to rejoin the reserve fleet, out of commission and berthed at Bremerton into December 1984.

Sphinx was called back to service in early 1985 and re-commissioned. After leaving Bremerton, WA, her new homeport of record was Key West, FL. Sphinx never saw Key West as the ship was immediately assigned to a permanently forward-deployed status off the west coast of Central America. She did not return to Little Creek until her decommissioning in 1989. For all practical purposes her homeport was Rodman, Panama.

Awards earned during the Vietnam War: Combat Action Ribbon, Presidential Unit Citation, (2) Navy Unit Commendations, RVN Gallantry Cross with Palm, RVN Civil Action Medal, First Class, with Palm, RVN Campaign Medal with 60’s device.


Dear SA Lewis Anthony Davis, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund | 1235 South Clark Street, Suite 910 | Arlington VA 22202 | 202.393.0090
The Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization. EIN: 52-1149668


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Cohoes Genealogy (in Albany County, NY)

NOTE: Additional records that apply to Cohoes are also found through the Albany County and New York pages.

Cohoes Birth Records

New York, Birth Records, 1880-present New York State Department of Health

Cohoes Cemetery Records

Van Schaick Burial Plot Billion Graves

Cohoes Census Records

United States Federal Census, 1790-1940 Family Search

Cohoes Church Records

Cohoes City Directories

Cohoes Death Records

New York, Death Records, 1880-present New York State Department of Health

Cohoes Histories and Genealogies

Cohoes Immigration Records

Cohoes Land Records

New York: Albany County Deeds, 1630-1894 American Ancestors

Cohoes Map Records

Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Cohoes, Albany County, New York, February 1891 Library of Congress

Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Cohoes, Albany County, New York, October 1896 Library of Congress

Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Cohoes, Albany County, New York, September 1885 Library of Congress

Cohoes Marriage Records

Cohoes Newspapers and Obituaries

Cohoes NY American 1920-1951 Fulton History

Cohoes advertiser. Cohoes, N.Y. 1847-02-09 to 1848-02-09 NYS Historic Newspapers

Offline Newspapers for Cohoes

According to the US Newspaper Directory, the following newspapers were printed, so there may be paper or microfilm copies available. For more information on how to locate offline newspapers, see our article on Locating Offline Newspapers.

Cohoes Cataract. (Cohoes, N.Y.) 1849-1881

Cohoes Daily Eagle. (Cohoes, N.Y.) 1875-1876

Cohoes Daily News. (Cohoes, N.Y.) 1874-1899

Cohoes Democrat. (Cohoes, N.Y.) 1870-1879

Cohoes Republican. (Cohoes, N.Y.) 1892-1920

Cohoes Probate Records

Cohoes School Records

Cohoes Tax Records

Additions or corrections to this page? We welcome your suggestions through our Contact Us page


Cohoes in the 1870s: Mills and More

Well, we’re on a bit of a Cohoes jag, and why not? The Spindle City sometimes had a bit of an inferiority complex, failing to get the respect of the Capital City or the Collar City, and after its boom it was always a working class mill town. But what a working class it had. The canals built by the Cohoes Company provided cheap power to mills throughout the city, and the grandest of them all was built at the head of the canals.

First opened in 1837, the Harmony Manufacturing Company grew for years with a change in ownership in 1850, it acquired other mills in the city while growing itself. “The existence of a manufacturing concern of such magnitude has of course been of the utmost benefit to Cohoes in a business point of view, and contributed largely to its prosperity. Through its means large accessions have been made to the population, and the constant expenditures made by the corporation in wages, in the erection of buildings and in various improvements have been of marked advantage to the commercial interests of the place,” Arthur Masten wrote in his The History of Cohoes, New York. “Their factory buildings are all handsomely constructed, and the grounds connected with them tastefully laid out the streets and sidewalks adjacent to their property are kept in the best condition, and the well built blocks of tenements which have been erected in different localities – more particularly on the West Harmony – are creditable additions to the buildings of the city. Of these tenements, which are nearly 1000 in number, over half have been erected since 1860… The tenements are let to the operatives at a merely nominal price, and in this, as in all other respects, the company has manifested a laudable regard for the comfort of those in its employ.”

In the 1870s, Harmony owned seven mills. One, Two and Three were built by the company Four was the former Ogden mill, and Five was the former Strong mill. There was also a jute mill and a bag mill. Despite an economic downturn in the mid-1870s, Harmony employees took a reduction in wages but saw minimal layoffs, and the mills in total employed 4,121 operatives in 1876, working at 5,650 looms and 258,054 spindles. Mill No. 3, the Mastodon mill, employed 1639 people at 2,654 looms, with 125,936 spindles in its expanse. The company processed 13,700,000 pounds of cotton and 2,240,000 pounds of jute that year, producing: 79,500,000 yards of printing cloths, percales, wigans, and jaconets 600,000 seamless bags 2,130,000 pounds of jute goods and 3,000 bales of cotton batting. Annual production was said to be $3 million.

Though by far the largest, Harmony was hardly the only operation that gave the Spindle City its nickname. Many of the improvements in the manufacture of fabric were made in Cohoes, and the knitting machines themselves were made there. Masten, writing when the Long Depression was still going strong, said “It is impossible at present to give accurately the statistics of production of the seventeen knitting mills which are now in operation. Since the panic [of 1873] many of them have been shut down for greater or less periods, and the number of operatives employed, and amount of wages paid, have varied the grade and style of the goods manufactured have been changed from time to time to suit the market, so that the amount of annual production cannot be exactly named.” But he did name the mills themselves, which were:

  • The Troy Manufacturing Company
  • The Root Manufacturing Company
  • H. Parsons & Co.
  • The Atlantic Mill
  • The Ranken Knitting Co.
  • American Hosiery Mill
  • The Victor Mill
  • The Empire Mill
  • The Star Knitting Co.
  • The Adams Mill
  • The Ontario Mill
  • The Mohawk Mill
  • The Erie Mill
  • The Enterprise Mill
  • The Diamond Mill
  • The Globe Mill
  • The Pine Grove Mill

In 1867, things got so bad that all the 15 mills then open in Cohoes agreed to shut down at once. The Troy Times reported that they employed 2,000 people (which doesn’t line up with Masten’s count I think it’s the amount still employed, and about the same number was laid off), and that all

“have agreed to shut down by the 15 th of August. Some of them have already ceased running, and all will do so as they respectively use up the stock on hand. The proprietors are buying no new stock whatever. The stock of shirts and drawers on hand is now enormous. They have been accumulating for months, because no profitable or even saving market was open to them. The proprietors show that it costs them $11[.]20 per dozen to manufacture shirts and drawers, and these are now and for some time have been selling in the great markets at $10[.]50 per dozen.”

The troubles continued at least through October of that year, when Harmony was running at some strength but other mills were laying off, and it was reported that 2,000 were out of work.

Textiles were hardly the only manufactures in Cohoes. Daniel Simmons and Horace Silliman established an axe and edge tool factory in 1835 (succeeding the original Simmons business in far-off Berne), and their products were said to have a worldwide reputation. The Weed & Becker Manufacturing Co. produced 100 dozen axes and 75 dozen tools daily in 1876. The Empire Edge Tool Works made up to 15,000 dozen axes and tools a year. The Ten Eyck Axe Manufacturing Company made 500 tools a day. The Cohoes Rolling Mill put out 6000 tons of bar and band iron a year. The Empire Tube Works made 3,000,000 feet of gas and steam pipe. Campbell and Clute made knitting machinery for the mills. The Cohoes Iron Foundery [sic] and Machine Shop made cotton, woolen and flouring mill machinery as well as architectural iron work. Tubbs & Severson made knitting machinery.

In those days before corporate names were conglomerated into meaninglessness, pretty much every company in Cohoes had what it did right up there on the sign: The Cohoes Knitting Needle Factory, the Sash and Blind Factory, the Cohoes Bedstead Factory, the Cohoes Straw Board Company, McMartin Flouring Mill, American Soap Company, Cohoes Lime and Cement Company, the Cohoes Warp and Thread Company. Trost and Bezner Manufacturing broke that trend, making furniture and other wooden items. There were five paper box factories, all with some intimation that they made boxes contained in their names.

Remarkably, Cohoes was then home to one daily paper and four weeklies, including one in French, as Cohoes had attracted a significant French Canadian population. It was also the home to four banks in 1876.


USS Cohoes (1867)

USS "Cohoes" — a single-turreted, twin-screw monitor — was still under construction at the close of the American Civil War . She was a "Casco"-class, light-draft monitor intended for service in the shallow bays, rivers, and inlets of the Confederacy. These warships sacrificed armor plate for a shallow draft and were fitted with a ballast compartment designed to lower them in the water during battle.

Though the original designs for the "Casco"-class monitors were drawn by John Ericsson , the final revision was created by Chief Engineer Alban B. Simers following Rear Admiral Samuel F. Du Pont's failed bombardment of Fort Sumter in 1863. By the time that the plans were put before the Monitor Board in New York, NY, Ericsson and Simers had a poor relationship, also Chief of Naval Construction John Lenthall had little connection to the board. This resulted in the plans being approved and 20 vessels ordered without serious scrutiny of the new design. $14 million US was allocated for the construction of these vessels. It was discovered that Simers had failed to compensate for the armor his revisions added to the original plan and this resulted in excessive stress on the wooden hull frames and a freeboard of only 3 inches. Simers was removed from the control of the project and Ericsson was called in to undo the damage. He was forced to raise the hulls of the monitors under construction by 22 inches to make them sea-worthy.

As a result, the "Cohoes" was laid up at League Island Navy Yard, in 1867. Her name was changed to "Charybdis" on 15 June 1869 and back to "Cohoes" on 19 August 1869. She was sold in July 1874.

External links

* [http://www.history.navy.mil/danfs/c10/cohoes-i.htm history.navy.mil: USS "Cohoes"]

Wikimedia Foundation . 2010 .

Look at other dictionaries:

USS Cohoes — Two ships of the United States Navy have been named Cohoes after the city of Cohoes, New York.*The USS|Cohoes|1867|6 was a light draft monitor.*The USS|Cohoes|AN 78 was launched 29 November 1944 by the Commercial Iron Works, in Portland, Oregon.… … Wikipedia

List of United States Navy ships, C — C * USS C 1 (SS 9) * USS C 2 (SS 13) * USS C 3 (SS 14) * USS C 4 (SS 15) * USS C 5 (SS 16) * SSV C Champion () * SSV C Commando () * USS C. F. Sargent (ID 3027) * USS C. P. Williams (1861) * USS C. W. Morse (ID 1966) Ca * USS Cabana (DE 260) *… … Wikipedia

Liste der Schiffe der United States Navy/C — Schiffe der United States Navy A B C … Deutsch Wikipedia

Albany (New York) — Albany Blick auf die Innenstadt von Albany … Deutsch Wikipedia

Albany, New York — Infobox Settlement name = Albany official name = City of Albany settlement type = City nickname = motto = Assiduity imagesize = image caption = Downtown Albany as seen from the Corning Tower. |pushpin pushpin label position = pushpin map caption … Wikipedia


یواس‌اس کوهوس (ای‌ان-۷۸)

یواس‌اس کوهوس (ای‌ان-۷۸) (به انگلیسی: USS Cohoes (AN-78) ) یک کشتی بود که طول آن ۱۶۸' ۶" بود. این کشتی در سال ۱۹۴۴ ساخته شد.

یواس‌اس کوهوس (ای‌ان-۷۸)
پیشینه
مالک
آغاز کار: ۲۹ نوامبر ۱۹۴۴
مشخصات اصلی
وزن: 775 tons
درازا: ۱۶۸' ۶"
پهنا: ۳۳' ۱۰"
آبخور: ۱۰' ۱۰"
سرعت: 12 knots

این یک مقالهٔ خرد کشتی یا قایق است. می‌توانید با گسترش آن به ویکی‌پدیا کمک کنید.


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Aloe-class net laying ship which was assigned to serve the U.S. Navy during World War II with her protective anti-submarine nets. Laid down 18 October 1940 by the American Shipbuilding Company, Cleveland, Ohio launched 13 February 1941 and commissioned 22 December 1942, Lt. R. L. Collins in command. Wikipedia

Aloe-class net laying ship which was assigned to serve U.S. Navy ships and harbors during World War II with her protective anti-submarine nets. Launched on 15 February 1941 at Houghton, Washington, by the Lake Washington Shipyards, Inc., and was placed in service on 1 July 1941, Lieutenant Charles E. Ide, USNR, in charge. Wikipedia

Aloe-class net laying ship which was assigned to serve the U.S. Navy during World War II with her protective anti-submarine nets. Laid down by the American Shipbuilding Company, Cleveland, Ohio, 18 October 1940 launched 22 February 1941 and commissioned 12 December 1942, Lt. Comdr. Max A. Morrison, USNR, in command. Wikipedia

Aloe-class net laying ship which was assigned to serve the U.S. Navy during World War II with her protective anti-submarine nets. Launched 20 March 1941 by the Marietta Manufacturing Co., Point Pleasant, West Virginia commissioned 16 September 1941, Algiers, Louisiana, Lt. George H. Burrows in command. Wikipedia

Aloe-class net laying ship which was assigned to serve the U.S. Navy during World War II with her protective anti-submarine nets. Laid down 18 October 1940 by American Shipbuilding Company, Cleveland, Ohio launched 22 February 1941 and placed in service 18 September 1941, Lt. H. W. Gaidsick in charge, for passage down the St. Lawrence River to the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, where she was fitted out. Wikipedia

Aloe-class net laying ship which was assigned to serve the U.S. Navy during World War II with her protective anti-submarine nets. Laid down 18 October 1940 by Marietta Manufacturing Company, Point Pleasant, West Virginia launched 2 July 1941 and placed in service 13 December 1941, Lt. C. B. Coale, USNR, in command. Wikipedia

Constructed for the United States Navy during World War II. To aid ships, usually by towing, on the high seas or in combat or post-combat areas, plus "other duties as assigned." Wikipedia


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